Monday, November 22, 2010

Thoughts on Food Choices

As you might imagine, I spend a fair amount of time thinking about food, usually really good food.  I happen to enjoy really good food, I enjoy cooking really good food, and I love being a part of making really good food available to my local eating community.  We live in an area where these foods are readily available on a local level.  I do not consider them "elitist", but it does maybe take a little more effort and planning to make them the main component of your daily eating.  For instance, you may need to concentrate your shopping to Saturday, if that is the day for your local farmers market.  And you might need to be able to plan your week on the fly, so to speak, depending on what is fresh and available.  But hey, this is the fun part! It gets a little more difficult when the markets start to end, as you may have to seek out the farmers individually, or rely on grocery store food for that part of the year.  Maybe a combination is what usually happens.



Goat Ricotta & Herbs Stuffed Squash Blossoms

I am certainly NOT opposed to doing the bulk (or even all) of your shopping in a grocery store.  You have the most amazing array of fresh foods on the planet in almost every neighborhood.  It is more about making good choices, cooking the food yourself,  staying away from packaged/processed foods, eating out less, and relying more on yourself.  Every day eating does not have to be "gourmet".  Your choices can be dictated by your available time.  Save the eating out for the really good places, and make it special.

I buy so little from the grocery store, mostly coffee and wine, but certainly other staples and foods as desired.  I was in the store last week getting pasta for a wild mushroom dinner I had planned.  I had some whole wheat pasta, some fresh vegetables, some staple food items, wine, a few canned items (tomatoes), but not any "junk" food.  I was behind two women with a huge cart of food.  I wasn't stalking them, but I don't look at the magazines in the line, so I saw their cart contents.  It was chock-a-block full of "junk"-donuts-chocolate and plain in a box, cookies, lots of soda, chips, white bread....the only "real" food was 2 mega sized packs of ground beef and one gallon of milk.  Their total was $117.00.  They paid with their food stamp card.  They were young and fairly overweight (ok, obese).  The contents of their cart told me they do not likely cook much.  I found it sad and a little irritating that the food stamp dollars can be spent this way.

Today I found this Newsweek article along these same thoughts:
http://www.newsweek.com/2010/11/22/what-food-says-about-class-in-america.html

It is my hope we can all begin making the more local and more natural choices.  For me, as a food provider, it is much bigger than that.  I also provide income for 4 employees.  And studies show for every dollar they earn, .68 stays in our local community.   My guess here is that number is even higher, as they too are locally focused on their choices.  I know the women who work here are highly skilled and accomplished women who truly love what they do.  I also know they depend on this income source.  I also know I cannot do it without them.  We have created a beautifully supportive and nurturing source for your local goat cheese needs.

Goat Ricotta Stuffed Tomatoes in Season

1 comment:

  1. Well-said. I know we do the "meals based on what's available" and actually just had a conversation about that just this evening as we threw together some rice, garden veggies, etc. for our dinner!

    You certainly have a plethora of options at your fingertips ... and we have many things handy and available too given our locale.

    There is a definite shift going on ... and I think it's a good one!

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