Monday, January 2, 2012

Pre-Kidding Checklist

Most of you know this stuff.  it is important to remember to do it.

1.  Assess each doe for body condition.  Make corrections if you have time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2ppHAUbLYY&feature=youtu.be

This short video that may help here.

2.  Be sure vaccines/injections/dewormers are up to date. We use CDT and BoSe here.

Assess Often
3.  Be sure hoofs are trimmed.  We do not trim in last month of pregnancy.  But if you have neglected this, do it.  Just be careful! The does get unwieldy on 3 legs.  Be careful. Avoid falls and injuries.

4.  Clip udders and teats as the udders begin filling.  We also do an "OB CLIP" of the tail area to minimize afterbirth goo after delivery.

5.  Be sure your OB supplies are well stocked.  Nothing as frustrating as realizing at 3am you don't have iodine for navel dipping or long gloves for an assisted delivery.  Get your orders in NOW.

6.  Also remember to have CMPK drench on hand for late-pregnancy, early postpartum needs.

7.  Stock your own freezer with kidding food for yourself.  Fuel for the caregiver is very important.  Those long, cold, miserable nights will go so much better with nutritious 'home food'.

Food Matters
8.  Rest Up!  You know this won't last long.

4 comments:

  1. All superb ideas. We always give our does a long drink of warm molasses water after delivery. Boy, do they love it. Helps 'em bounce back faster, we think. And make sure the pasteurizer is ready to handle/heat-treat another year's colostrum.

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  2. Jill & George-Thanks for the helpful additions. I know a l lot of people give molasses water & they love it. Here we give a bucket of plain warm water, some grain, and a handful of raisins & peanuts if we have them. I will be updating posts with other kidding tasks soon here. Do you think a post on how to heat treat colostrum & pasteurize milk would be helpful as well? Thanks for the excellent suggestions.

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  3. Is your kidding year-round or seasonal?

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  4. Goats breed seasonally at our latitude. They mate in Fall for Spring kids. That creates quite a flurry of activity seemingly at once when they all arrive in about an 8-10 week period. We control it only by which does are exposed to which bucks (fully planned matings). The flip side is we get a slower period right now in Winter. That's when all the undone chores get done like deep cleaning, painting, fence fixing, etc. Gestation is about 145 days. It comes up fast!

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